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Archive for February 13th, 2012|Daily archive page

today’s news … Monday, February 13, 2012

In Uncategorized on February 13, 2012 at 6:00 am

today’s news and information gleanings from here and there! 

Quote for today “I will always love you.” – sung by Whitney Houston, the song written by Dolly Parton
 
  • “A former Wrightsville-area constable who drove a female prisoner to the Susquehanna River to “watch the sun rise” was found guilty of misdemeanor charges Friday at his non-jury trial.” – York Dispatch
  • “The following area students were named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology: Robert Miller, Columbia; Hannah Breneman, Washington Boro; Alex Yost, Mountville.” – Lancaster Intelligencer Journal/New Era
  • “PROVIDENCE, R.I.—Lottery officials say someone who played the Powerball in Rhode Island has won the $336.4 million jackpot. The new multimillionaire has not stepped forward and the lottery has not said where the winning ticket was sold. To win, the player had to match all of Saturday’s five numbers, 1-10-37-52-57, and Powerball number 11. Because of rising sales, the jackpot more than doubled from $173.5 million on Feb. 1. Powerball is played in 42 states, Washington, D.C., and the U.S. Virgin Islands.” – The Associated Press

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“Lancaster County family seeks first-hand learning experience by traveling the country”

In Everyday Living, People on February 13, 2012 at 5:32 am

by Brad Kane, The (Harrisburg) Patriot News

Submitted photo (The Patriot News, Harrisburg) – The Smuckers — from left, Lucy, Maile, Abra, Shawn, Sam and Cade — will travel more than 10,000 miles over 33 states

“E.L. Doctorow once said that ‘Writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.’ ” — Anne Lamott, from her book “Bird by Bird.”

“Shawn Smucker keeps turning that phrase over and over in his head. It’s been an inspirational phrase of sorts for the Lancaster County man as he embarks on a journey that at first glance seems hard to believe.

“Smucker, who knows a thing or two about writing as a published author and blogger, is leaving his home in Paradise, taking his wife, Maile, and four children on a four-month, cross-country trek.

“Using a 40-foot RV that was once used by none other than famous traveler Willie Nelson, the Smucker family will hit the road Wednesday.

“That’s six people, four of them under age 10, sleeping in campgrounds and Walmart parking lots as they travel to 33 states, covering 10,000 miles in a lap of the country. They’ll follow a loosely defined itinerary of meet-ups with fellow writers, some the Smuckers have never met, and far-flung family members.

“The goal is simple: to see the country and educate their children that what might seem impossible is, in fact, downright real.

“It’s not a story of some sort of hippie-commune family with grandiose visions. Rather, the Smuckers’ tale is one of a family taking a step in faith and not playing by the rules that society would usually dictate.”

To read this article in its entirety, click here.

A push for family input to detect dementia earlier

In Everyday Living, Opportunities on February 13, 2012 at 4:58 am

This Associated Press article was published in newspapers around the nation, including locally, last week. Because early dementia continues to plague and confound families, Columbia news, views & reviews is reproducing this article here.

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer’s assisted-living facility, shares a light moment with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2012. Dementia can sneak up on families because its sufferers are pretty adept at covering lapses early on, longer if their spouses are there to compensate. Doctors too frequently are fooled as well. Now specialists are pushing for the first National Alzheimer’s Plan to help overcome this barrier to detection _ urging what’s called dementia-capable primary care, more screenings for warning signs, and regular checks of caregivers’ own physical and mental health. Photo: Charles Dharapak / AP

Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Alexis McKenzie’s mother had mild dementia, but things sounded OK when she phoned home: Dad was with her, finishing his wife’s sentences as they talked about puttering through the day and a drive to the store.

Then their phone service was cut off. “I mailed that check,” McKenzie’s father insisted. No, he’d mailed the phone company a bank deposit slip instead. McKenzie visited and discovered spoiling food. Dad the caregiver was in trouble, too.

Dementia can sneak up on families. Its sufferers are pretty adept at covering lapses early on, and spouses are sometimes there to compensate. Doctors too frequently are fooled as well. Now specialists are pushing for the first National Alzheimer’s Plan to help overcome this barrier to early detection, urging what’s called dementia-capable primary care, more screenings for warning signs and regular checks of caregivers’ own physical and mental health.

For a doctor to ask someone with brewing dementia, “How are you?” isn’t enough, says Read the rest of this entry »

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